Philosophy

Flower duet - Anna Netrebko & Elina Garanca (Lakmé de Delibes)



  
Anna Netrebko (soprano).
Elina Garanca (mezzo-soprano). 
Baden-Baden Opera Gala 2007. 

Duo des fleurs.

Lakmé, Flower duet (Duetto) by Léo Delibes : 
Viens, Mallika... Dôme épais le jasmin.
http://www.agoravox.tv 




A bushbaby peering out of its hiding place in a tree.

 

A bush-baby peering out of its hiding place in a tree. (Photo: Lynne Wilde)





Harvard's new RoboBee can fly in and out of water



Image result for robobee robot

Insect-sized robot

Image result for robobee robot


Image result for robobee robot


Harvard's new RoboBee can fly in and out of water

The team is hoping their work can inspire microrobots that have more capabilities.




Mariella Moon, @mariella_moon
10.26.17 in Robots








Apparently, we haven't seen RoboBee's final form yet. Harvard researchers introduced the robot back in 2013 and developed a version that uses static to stick to walls in 2016.

Now, the scientists have created an upgraded robotic bee that can fly, dive into water and hop right back up into the air.

That's a lot tougher than it sounds, since the tiny machine is only two centimeters tall and is about one-fifteenth the weight of a penny.

For such a small robot, swimming in water is like swimming in molasses and breaking through the water's surface is akin to breaking through a brick wall.
To solve the issue, the researchers from Harvard Wyss Institute and John A. Paulson School of Engineering designed new mechanisms that make it possible for the RoboBee to transition seamlessly from water to air.

First, they had to figure out the right flapping speeds for its wings in aerial and aquatic environments. By using a combination of theoretical modeling and experimental data, they determined that 220 to 300 hertz is perfect for aerial travel, while 9 to 13 hertz is the perfect speed in the water.

Once that was done, they had to figure out how the machine can break surface tension to be able to get out of the water.

They came up with a two-step system: First, the machine collects water into a buoyancy chamber as it swims to the surface.

An electrolytic plate inside the chamber converts the water into oxyhydrogen, which provides enough extra buoyancy for the robot's wings to pop out of the water. A sparker in the chamber then ignites the combustible oxyhydrogen, turning it into fuel that gives RoboBee the boost it needs to be able to get back into the air.

In the future, microrobots can be used for search missions, deployed to far-off places for surveillance before sending in bigger machines to rescue people.

The RoboBee team hopes their work "investigating tradeoffs like weight and surface tension can inspire future multi-functional microrobots -- ones that can move on complex terrains and perform a variety of tasks."








Coverage: New Atlas 


The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering uses biological design principles to develop new engineering innovations that will transform medicine and create a more sustainable world.




 
The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering uses biological design principles to develop new engineering innovations that will transform medicine and create a more sustainable world.


At the Wyss Institute, we leverage recent insights into how Nature builds, controls and manufactures to develop new engineering innovations - a new field of research we call Biologically Inspired Engineering.

By emulating biological principles of self assembly, organization and regulation, we are developing disruptive technology solutions for healthcare, energy, architecture, robotics, and manufacturing, which are translated into commercial products and therapies through formation of new startups and corporate alliances.

We have 8 major Focus Areas.


Through our Innovation Funnel, we harness the creative freedom of academia to generate a pipeline of new ideas and potential breakthrough technologies; enable our staff with product development experience to prototype, mature and de-risk these technologies; and leverage our internal business development team, intellectual property experts, and entrepreneurs-in-residence to drive commercialization, through industrial partnerships, licensing agreements, and the creation of startups.






Addicted to Distraction: Psychological Consequences of the Modern Mass Media Book

Addicted to Distraction - Psychological consequences of the Mass Media by Bruce G Charlton - available online

*
My most recent book is now available online, complete - 26,000 worda approximately.

If you want to read it, I recommend you copy, paste, maybe edit - then print out.

http://addictedtodistraction.blogspot.co.uk/
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Quotes of the Week

“There is only one thing more painful than learning from experience, and that is not learning from experience.” – Laurence J. Peter

“Science and art belong to the whole world, and before them vanish the barriers of nationality.” – Goethe

“Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of the imagination.” – John Dewey

“The capacity of the female mind for studies of the highest order cannot be doubted, having been sufficiently illustrated by its works of genius, of erudition, and of science.” – James Madison

“Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person at the bottom.” – Sandra Day O’Connor

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” – Harry S. Truman

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” – Thomas Edison

“The art and science of asking questions is the source of all knowledge.” – Thomas Berger






“There is only one thing more painful than learning from experience, and that is not learning from experience.” – Laurence J. Peter

“Science and art belong to the whole world, and before them vanish the barriers of nationality.” – Goethe

“Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of the imagination.” – John Dewey

“The capacity of the female mind for studies of the highest order cannot be doubted, having been sufficiently illustrated by its works of genius, of erudition, and of science.” – James Madison

“Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person at the bottom.” – Sandra Day O’Connor

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” – Harry S. Truman

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” – Thomas Edison

“The art and science of asking questions is the source of all knowledge.” – Thomas Berger


Interesting Pictures


 

"The nerve"

Review your German with the "all-holy" of .

The takes you into troubled waters.
 
With the of the : you'll love the long winter evenings.
Not even scared you say?


'The Russian revolution, is the French revolution who arrives late because of the cold' Dali
 

"The scale of the fire"
 
The : a brilliant idea.
the most terrifying works of our collections... ☛
  ☛
Translated from French by
☽ In tonight we reveal the most terrifying of our works... ☛
 
The Assyrian demon Pazuzu puts a spell on you! Protect yourself against the evil eye at the museum today!

To (re) discover the exhibition!
  the evil fairy Carabosse from “The Sleeping Beauty”!
 
photographed by in the 1950s. Magic!
 
 
Oct 26
Relationship of the human figure with that of the lion by Charles LE BRUN ☛


To accompany the release of the film "Mystery " go to the Louvre discovered one of his paintings! ☛
 Image result for North American Whooping Crane by Nikki Vail

“The ADHD Poem” by IF (Animated Version)